Personal Financial Disclosures

Personal Financial Disclosures are a series of documents, information and references requested by a lender as part of the mortgage approval process. The nature and depth of these disclosures vary wildly by each borrower's financial situation (and the property being purchased), and often the same series of documents may be requested multiple times (to provide updated versions of them as time unfolds).

Some of the most commonly requested documents are:

  • Several months of statements for each bank account a borrower holds (including any investment accounts)
  • Several months of statements for any outstanding loans, lines of credit, or other liabilities. This can also include documentation of rent payments.
  • Up to two years of tax returns, released to the lender via an authorization submitted by the buyer using IRS form 4506-T.
  • Recent pay stubs and contact information for each borrower's employer. The number of pay stubs varies by situation.
  • Any other disclosures that are material to a borrower's financial situation. This includes but is not limited to marriage licenses, divorce settlements, child support, liens, bankruptcies, or judgments. If there's something that affects how much money you have on hand that isn't shown by simply looking at your salary, be prepared to document it.
  • Explanation of any credit inquiries
  • Substantiation of any large deposits or cash gifts that aren't regular income. In some cases, a large cash gift may look similar to a personal loan by a friend or family member, and lenders will require gift letters from those that gave you the cash gift, stating that the gift was not a loan. They may also ask for itemized deposit slips. The exact amount that triggers this requirement varies by situation (for instance, a $1,000 cash gift may be material to a single borrower that makes $35,000/yr but may not be material to a borrower that makes $350,000/yr), so it's good practice to ask your lender if you suspect you might have a material cash gift or large deposit - so you aren't surprised by this at the last minute.
  • Repeated and updated documentation of any of the above. Keep in mind: to a lender, anything can happen to a borrower's personal financial situation and credit during the escrow process. Thus, you may be asked more than once for the same type of document so that your lender has the most recent pay stubs, rent receipts, bank statements, or other disclosures that may change over time. Any material changes in these documents -or any element of your personal financial situation- may require the lender to reassess your eligability for the loan for which you've applied.

This document is a community edited guide, is not legal advice, and is subject to changes, modifications, and may contain inaccuracies or out-of-date information. As with any important financial transaction, consult a real estate professional and/or an attorney. See our terms of service for more information.

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